ACCESS OUR SCHEDULE
& EXCLUSIVE WEB SPECIAL

Secure your spot and get started today with our EXCLUSIVE offer!

ACCESS OUR SCHEDULE
& EXCLUSIVE WEB SPECIAL

Secure your spot and get started today with our EXCLUSIVE offer!

Summer Benefield reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

My daughter started here about a month ago and I cannot say enough about the wonderful team they have there. They truly love and take great pride in the work they do for and with these children. My daughter is so pumped to go to practice it kind of surprised me because after a few times at something she can tend to loose interest but not with this. I not only give her credit for this but the people at BMA. I could not be happier with deciding to join their program.

Perrault Young reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

Hello folks! I was in martial arts when I was younger and I am glad we found this location for my son, Caden. The instructors have a great deal of patience with every student and really focus on their needs. It is a clean and safe environment where you or/and your child can learn a great art/sport and make new friends as well while sparring with them :).

Kristi Bass Tomberlin reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

My daughter started here 3 months ago and she loves it. I have seen improvement in her attitude, confidence and self defense. Everyone there (staff, parents or other students) is so helpful and friendly. I would highly recommend BMA!

Sherry Neesen Banks reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

My son started when he was 3 1/2 years old in the Little Dragon program and now 7 years later he is a 1st degree black belt working towards his 2nd. For his black belt test he had to write an essay on his Journey to Becoming A Black Belt, we were amazed on what he accomplished not only with the sport itself but the underlying accomplishments. Discipline, hard work, respect, confidence, leadership, team building, communication, problem solving and other everyday life traits that one needs to survive in today's world. You can try a class for free to see if it is a good fit for you which I think is great. I highly recommend them so come try it out. What do you have to lose?

Melanie Miller reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

We are glad to be part of the BAMA clan! Practicing karate with my children, husband and godchild is a blessing.

Peggy McCorkle Cropp reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

We could not be more pleased with the results that our family has experienced since our son became a BAMA student. We have watched him grow in strength, discipline, confidence, intelligence, endurance, and the list goes on. He has learned skills that wouldn't otherwise be available to him including, working with weapons and self defense. The staff at BAMA don't just teach Tang Soo Do, they teach life skills and we are enjoying the experience every step of the way.

Heather Hayes Jackson reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

This isn't just a karate studio, it is a family. The instructors really do care and want their students to succeed! Our family of 5 all train at BAMA and, although we are all different ranks, we are able to practice together and take several classes together throughout the week. It's a great family activity! The Cage Fitness class is a lot of fun too. You almost forget you are working out...almost.

Tammy Cupps Hart reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

My husband & I began training at Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts in July of 2015. Our children started in June of the same year. We love going to classes each week & training together. One of the best things about doing class as a family, is that we're all striving for the same goal, & we use that to keep each other motivated! Two years ago, I would never have thought I'd be taking karate, now I wish I had started sooner!

Ryan Hart reviewed Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts
5
via Facebook

My family & I have been training here for just over 3 months. It has been a great experience for us to be able to train together. The Instructors are great with the kids. they are very attentive and make sure that everyone is learning the forms and techniques correctly, and assist anyone that is having trouble. I highly recommend BAMA to anyone wanting to learn self defense or is looking for a different way to get in shape besides joining a gym.

Birmingham Academy of Martial Arts Trussville Martial Arts & Fitness for All Ages!
Call us today to get started 205-909-3720
Request Information

Blog

Our latest news & thoughts

Memorial Day – Martial Arts in the Military

When you think of the US military, you probably think of high-tech weaponry – smart bombs and things like that. What you might not know is that the martial arts play an important role in military training.

Being proficient in hand-to-hand combat can save soldiers’ lives. There are several forms of martial arts that are commonly used in military training.

Marine Corps Martial Arts Program

The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, or MCMAP, was designed to train US Marines. It was created in 1956 by Gunnery Sergeant Bill Miller, who was put in charge of the Marines’ hand-to-hand combat training. It combines elements of:

  • Okinawan karate
  • Judo
  • Tae Kwon Do
  • Wushu
  • Boxing
  • Jujitsu

MCMAP trains soldiers in the mental, character, and physical traits needed to defend themselves. It uses a belt system similar to the one used in civilian martial arts training. However, it also teaches basic knife, bayonet, and firearms techniques, as well as how to find and use weapons of opportunity.

How successful has this program been? In 2017, the UFC sent five of its best fighters to take on US Marines in hand-to-hand combat. The UFC fighters lost badly.

The US Army has a similar program called the US Army’s Combatives Program.

Tae Kwon Do

Tae Kwon Do is a Korean martial art that was originally developed in the 1940s and 1950s. Its creators were men who had studied a variety of martial arts and taught them in schools called kwans. In 1952, after witnessing a martial arts demonstration, South Korean President Syngman Rhee called for the creation of a unified Korean style of martial arts.

The original name of this discipline was Tae Soo Do, which combines three words:

  • Tae – to stomp or trample
  • Soo – hand
  • Do – way or discipline

Eventually the word kwon, which means fist, replaced soo in the name, and Tae Kwon Do became the official name. As a discipline, Tae Kwon Do emphasizes speed and agility, training fighters to use head-height kicks and spinning techniques to defeat their opponents.

Jujitsu

Jujitsu has its origins in the Muromachi period in Japan, which ran from 1336 to 1573. It came from a style of fighting that prioritized using an opponents weight and momentum against them instead of striking them.

The name Jujitsu did not attach itself to the discipline until the 18th century. Loosely translated, it means “the gentle art” because of its focus on leveraging an opponent’s actions instead of actively striking out against them.

A common variation taught in the military is Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which is a technique that focuses on ground fighting. The idea behind Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is that a smaller opponent can overwhelm a larger one by taking the fight to the ground and using chokeholds and joint locks to win the fight.

Krav Maga

Krav Maga is a unique style of martial arts developed for the Israeli Military. It dates to 1910, when a man named Imi Lichtenfeld. He had learned various fighting techniques from his father, and eventually combined them into Krav Maga.

The focus of Krav Maga is on ending fights quickly by targeting the most vulnerable parts of the body – usually the groin is the focus. It was designed for use in real-world situations. Its practicality appealed to the Israeli Military, which adopted it and incorporated it into their training – and there’s no question that Krav Maga training is one of the things that gives the Israeli military its formidable reputation.

Conclusion

Martial arts training is used to help service members defend themselves when traditional weapons alone might not be enough. The success of MCMAP and the Israeli Army’s Krav Maga training are proof that learning the martial arts can save lives.